Anastasia
Περισσότερες ιδέες από το Anastasia
Peter Kogler “Next”, ING Art Center, Brussel.

Peter Kogler “Next”, ING Art Center, Brussel.

Generative Design by Seth Mach, via Behance

Generative Design by Seth Mach, via Behance

galleryofsmart:  Gallery of Smart - Curated Visuals + W + L

galleryofsmart: Gallery of Smart - Curated Visuals + W + L

Graphic design inspiration | #1100

Graphic design inspiration | #1100

Two birds on a wire, one tries to fly away, and the other watches him close from that wire, he say he wants to as well, but he is a liar.

Two birds on a wire, one tries to fly away, and the other watches him close from that wire, he say he wants to as well, but he is a liar.

soundpony-10210 / bryanbryan #grafica #poster #optical

soundpony-10210 / bryanbryan #grafica #poster #optical

Great Wall of China - 1 of the wonders of the World . Also the only structure on Earth that can be seen from the Moon .

Great Wall of China - 1 of the wonders of the World . Also the only structure on Earth that can be seen from the Moon .

Great Wall, China -- I wanna go here. Not to do something crazy like walk the whole thing but it would be nice to have a picnic on like 30 feet of it...lol.

Great Wall, China -- I wanna go here. Not to do something crazy like walk the whole thing but it would be nice to have a picnic on like 30 feet of it...lol.

Great Wall of China via christineknight.me

Great Wall of China via christineknight.me

The Great Wall of China. The Great Wall runs more than 13,000 miles—the distance by plane from New York to Beijing and back. In Chinese, it’s called changcheng, literally “long wall.” Over thousands of years these walls have been destroyed, rebuilt, maintained, and extended; much of the wall you see today dates to the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644). A handful of sections of the Great Wall are accessible from Beijing.

The Great Wall of China. The Great Wall runs more than 13,000 miles—the distance by plane from New York to Beijing and back. In Chinese, it’s called changcheng, literally “long wall.” Over thousands of years these walls have been destroyed, rebuilt, maintained, and extended; much of the wall you see today dates to the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644). A handful of sections of the Great Wall are accessible from Beijing.