Lise meitner

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Carolyn Reeves
Lise Meitner (1878 - 1968) was an Austrian physicist who interpreted the data and worked out the mathematics to prove that atoms could be split. Although offered work on the Manhattan Project, she refused because she didn't want to work on a bomb. Because she fled the Nazis, her research partner got credit for the discovery and won a Nobel Prize.

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In December of 1938, Lise Meitner received a letter from colleagues in Germany explaining their latest experimental results and questioning what these results could mean. For almost 30 years Lise h…

For Women's History Month 2015, I posted daily biographies of women scientists. In case you couldn't tell by my Women in STEM jewelry series, I'm pretty obsesse

2015 Women's History Month STEM Biography Series Roundup

For Women's History Month 2015, I posted daily biographies of women scientists. In case you couldn't tell by my Women in STEM jewelry series, I'm pretty obsessed with women in science history. Want to learn about more women's history? I'm also continuing this tradition of bringing attention to incredible science ladie

Lise Meitner, (1878-1968) A Jewish scientist, she escaped from the Nazis to Sweden in 1938, and carried out the key calculations that led to the discovery of nuclear fission. Her collaborator, Otto Hahn, who stayed behind in Germany, was the sole recipient of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1944. In 1997 Meitner was finally honored when element 109 was named meitnerium.

Vous ne verrez pas leurs noms dans les manuels scolaires... Et pourtant, ces 10 femmes ont révolutionné le monde des sciences !

Voici 10 femmes qui ont contribué, de manière significative, à l'avancée de la science. Pourtant, elles sont encore largement méconnues. Certaines n'ont...

Lise Meitner - In in 1939 she helped discover a process they called nuclear fission. In possibly the most egregious example of a scientist being overlooked for an award, it was Hahn (her colleague) who received the 1944 Nobel prize for the discovery. She was mentioned three times in the presentation speech, however, and Hahn named her nine times in his Nobel lecture. She had an element named after her posthumously.

Unsung heroines: Six women denied scientific glory

Meet some of the female geniuses who missed out on the jobs, renown and Nobel prizes they deserved

Lise Meitner -- In collaboration with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, became first to recognize uranium atom actually split when bombarded by neutrons. (Chemical Heritage Foundation)

Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann

Chemistry and physics overlap at the level where investigations of the smallest particles of matter are carried out. Therefore, it was appropriate that Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann teamed up to combine their expertise in both fields. Hahn’s Early Career With doctorate in hand from the University of Marburg in Germany, Hahn (1879–1968) intended to make a career as an industrial chemist with a company with international business connections.

Radioactive!: How Irène Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World

Radioactive!

Radioactive! book. Read 62 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The fascinating, little-known story of how two brilliant female physic...

Lise Meitner nació en la Viena del Imperio Austrohúngaro, hoy Austria, en el año 1878 y falleció en 1968. Fue una física con un amplio desarrollo en el campo de la radioactividad y la física nuclear, siendo parte fundamental del equipo que descubrió la fisión nuclear, aunque solo su colega Otto Hahn obtuvo el reconocimiento (imaginen el por qué). Años más tarde, el meitnerio (elemento químico de valor atómico 109) fue nombrado así en su honor.

Lise Meitner nació en la Viena del Imperio Austrohúngaro, hoy Austria, en el año 1878 y falleció en 1968. Fue una física con un amplio desarrollo en el campo de la radioactividad y la física nuclear, siendo parte fundamental del equipo que descubrió la fisión nuclear, aunque solo su colega Otto Hahn obtuvo el reconocimiento (imaginen el por qué). Años más tarde, el meitnerio (elemento químico de valor atómico 109) fue nombrado así en su honor.

Velociraptor, artwork - Stock Image - C004/4182

Velociraptor. Computer artwork of a Velociraptor dinosaur.

Lise Meitner (1878-1968) with Science Talent Search finalists, 1946

Lise Meitner (1878-1968) with Science Talent Search finalists, 1946

Creator: Science Service Subject: Meitner, Lise 1878-1968 Catholic University of America Type: Black-and-white photographs Date: 1946 Topic: Science fairs Physics Women scientists Local number: SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-5997] Summary: During Spring 1946, physicist Lise Meitner (1878-1968), of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, was a Visiting Professor of Physics at Catholic University, Washington, D.C., and met with finalists in the Science Talent Search competition. Left to right: James…

...Lise Meitner (1878 – 1968) foi a física austríaca responsável pela descoberta da fissão nuclear – o processo por trás da geração de energia nuclear e de armas atômicas. Depois de completar seu doutorado na Universidade de Viena, Meitner partiu para Berlim, onde estudou com o físico Max Planck e trabalhou em parceria com o químico Otto Hahn durante trinta anos no Instituto Kaiser Wilhelm. Nele, Meitner se tornou a primeira mulher a se tornar professora integral de Física na Alemanha.

23 Mulheres Incríveis da Ciência e da Tecnologia que Dariam Ótimos Filmes

Inspirada pelas incríveis personagens geniais recentes da cultura pop, selecionei 23 mulheres reais da Ciência e da Tecnologia que dariam ótimos filmes! Durante muito tempo, mulheres foram ativamente impedidas de atuar em áreas que fugissem do que era era considerado tradicionalmente feminino. Muitas delas, no entanto, conseguiram romper barreiras e abrir portas para as gerações […]

Lize Meitner

Dr. Lize Meitner 1878-1968, Austrian by Everett

Dr. Lize Meitner 1878-1968, Austrian Photograph by Everett

Lise Meitner (1878 – 1968) study radioactivity

Ten Historic Female Scientists You Should Know

Before Marie Curie, these women dedicated their lives to science and made significant advances