Nafplion... The once capital of Greece

Some interesting place to visit when you find yourself wondering in the streets of Nafplion.
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Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened, is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened, is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened, is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened, is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened,  is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Galleries or tunnels over 20 m in length were opened within the south and east walls and constructed by corbelling (gradually projecting overlaying large blocks) to create high archways topped by a single stone. The thickness of the wall at the points that the famous tunnels are opened, is up to 17 m Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The Palace of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The Palace of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The Palace of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The Palace of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The cyclopean walls (13th c. BC) of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC). The thickness of the wall is very large, usually reaches the 6 meters. Ancient Tiryns was inhabited since the Neolithic Age (7th- 4th Millenium BC) and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The cyclopean walls (13th c. BC) of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC). The thickness of the wall is very large, usually reaches the 6 meters. Ancient Tiryns was inhabited since the Neolithic Age (7th- 4th Millenium BC) and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The way (47 m long by 4.7 m wide) leading to the Great Gate of the Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The way (47 m long by 4.7 m wide) leading to the Great Gate of the Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC)

The cyclopean walls (13th c. BC) of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC). Ancient Tiryns was inhabited since the Neolithic Age (7th- 4th Millenium BC) and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The cyclopean walls (13th c. BC) of Ancient Tiryns Mycenaean Citadel (16th c. BC). Ancient Tiryns was inhabited since the Neolithic Age (7th- 4th Millenium BC) and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Nafplion, Greece

Nafplion, Greece

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