gio geo
Περισσότερες ιδέες από το gio
Cyprus idol

Cyprus idol

Zoomorphic rattle  clay  Cypriot  Cypro-Archaic II period  600-480 BC

Zoomorphic rattle clay Cypriot Cypro-Archaic II period 600-480 BC

Terracotta rattle Period: Late Cypriot IB Date: ca. 1600–1450 B.C. Culture: Cypriot Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm)

Terracotta rattle Period: Late Cypriot IB Date: ca. 1600–1450 B.C. Culture: Cypriot Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm)

Terracotta head of a bull | Late cypro-archaic period, late 6th century BC | Cypriot

Terracotta head of a bull | Late cypro-archaic period, late 6th century BC | Cypriot

Limestone male head, late 6th century B.C. Greek. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76 (74.51.2836) #mustache #movember

Limestone male head, late 6th century B.C. Greek. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76 (74.51.2836) #mustache #movember

Sypialnia

Sypialnia

WTC Transportation Hub’s Breathtaking Scale…

WTC Transportation Hub’s Breathtaking Scale…

Cyprus - Cyprus archaeological Museum, Nicosia

Cyprus - Cyprus archaeological Museum, Nicosia

“Astarte” Figures, Clay 13th century B.C. Cyprus.

“Astarte” Figures, Clay 13th century B.C. Cyprus.

The Idol of Pomos, is a prehistoric sculpture from the Cypriot village of Pomos. It dates back to the Chalcolithic period, (ca 3000 BC) The sculpture is on display in the Cyprus Archaeological Museum in Nicosia. The idol represents a woman with her arms spread. Many similar idols have been found on Cyprus. Probably used as a fertility symbol, smaller versions were worn as amulets around the neck, just as this idol wears a small copy of itself.

The Idol of Pomos, is a prehistoric sculpture from the Cypriot village of Pomos. It dates back to the Chalcolithic period, (ca 3000 BC) The sculpture is on display in the Cyprus Archaeological Museum in Nicosia. The idol represents a woman with her arms spread. Many similar idols have been found on Cyprus. Probably used as a fertility symbol, smaller versions were worn as amulets around the neck, just as this idol wears a small copy of itself.