Omaha Beach

Collection by Heather McAfee Ricketts

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Heather McAfee Ricketts
June 6, 1944

Vintage Postcard Covers #50-99

A cover gallery for Vintage Postcards

Operation Overlord began on 6 June 1944. It involved 160 000 Allied troops at the Battle of Normandy and the D-Day Landings, and by August there were over 3 000 000 Allied troops in France.

The Great Crusade

Operation Overlord began on 6 June 1944. It involved 160 000 Allied troops at the Battle of Normandy and the D-Day Landings, and by August there were over 3 000 000 Allied troops in France.

Here's a Normandy Beach landing photo they don't show you in textbooks. Brave women of the Red Cross arriving in 1944 to help the injured troops.

Here's a Normandy Beach landing photo they don't show you in textbooks. Brave women of the Red Cross arriving in 1944 to help the injured troops.

D-Day June 6 1944. "You are about to embark upon the great crusade toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you...I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle." -Dwight D. Eisenhower

WWII in Europe

very cool photos. how do i follow your blog? very simple, check on the right column of Daily Lazy!! These photos somehow reminds me the movie Saving private ryan http://hometofirst.tumblr.com/

D-Day on Omaha Beach

US nurses landing at Normandy July 4, 1944

World War II: Women at War

Part 13 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II

Pointe du Hoc. Omaha Beach, pockmarked by D-Day bombardment.

Squirrel in the sky

Post with 88 views. Squirrel in the sky

German pillbox on Omaha Beach.

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D Day, 6 June 1944: American B26s with the striped tactical identification markings shown by all allied aircraft support the invasion of Normandy.

D Day, 6 June 1944: American B26s with the striped tactical identification markings shown by all allied aircraft support the invasion of Normandy.