16th century clothing

Step back in time with these elegant 16th century clothing ideas. Embrace the Renaissance fashion and create a timeless look that will make you stand out from the crowd.
One-piece garment worn by women from later Middle Ages into Baroque period. Typically worn over a chemise or smock which acted as a slip and under the formal outer garment or gown/surcoat. Kirtles began as loose garments without a waist seam, changing to tightly fitted supportive garments in the 14th century. Later kirtles could be constructed by combining a fitted bodice with a skirt gathered or pleated into a waist seam. They could lace up the front, back or side-back, and be embellished. Woman Fashion, Photography Poses, Outfits, Popsugar, Winter, Fashion, Winter Fashion, Winter Outfits, Photography

One-piece garment worn by women from later Middle Ages into Baroque period. Typically worn over a chemise or smock which acted as a slip and under the formal outer garment or gown/surcoat. Kirtles began as loose garments without a waist seam, changing to tightly fitted supportive garments in the 14th century. Later kirtles could be constructed by combining a fitted bodice with a skirt gathered or pleated into a waist seam. They could lace up the front, back or side-back, and be embellished.

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Joanne Howe
Historical Clothing Patterns, Historical Clothing, Historical Dresses, 16th Century Clothing, Renaissance Costume, Renaissance Fashion, Century, American Duchess, 16th Century Fashion

Every once in awhile I go meandering off into other centuries. My love of costuming started with Elizabethan, and it is still a period I adore, though I seldom costume for it anymore (a pity, really). Of course, with Valhalla Renaissance Festival coming up, uh,

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Ana Almería
Medieval Clothing, Medieval Dress, Costume, Medieval Fashion, 10th Century Clothing Women, 14th Century Clothing, Medieval Dress Pattern, 13th Century Fashion, Medieval Costume

*** Welcome to the photo dump for my new blue kirtle (the construction of which was recently documented in my latest Dress Diary). Based on early 16th century illustrations, the kirtle laces up the front and features short sleeves, a 'V' back, and a shaped skirt (constructed with piecing). It was originally inspired by a page from Catherine de Medici's Book of Hours. Although less popular later in the century, blue seemed to be a fairly ubiquitous colour in the first decades of the 16th…

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Wynter SunRose