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Evolutionary biology

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Evolutionary biology. Get inspired and try out new things.
AP Biology Unit 6: Ecology and Animal Behavior Cheat Sheet by hlewsey http://www.cheatography.com/hlewsey/cheat-sheets/ap-biology-unit-6-ecology-and-animal-behavior/ #cheatsheet #animal #learning #ecology #biology #behavior #populations #communities #ecosystems #symbiosis

AP Biology Unit 6: Ecology and Animal Behavior Cheat Sheet by hlewsey http://www.cheatography.com/hlewsey/cheat-sheets/ap-biology-unit-6-ecology-and-animal-behavior/ #cheatsheet #animal #learning #ecology #biology #behavior #populations #communities #ecosystems #symbiosis

Biology revision ( 9700)

​ [MARCH 2022 - Google Drive](https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/1-260nRUS_MQYNuwVh7mBZotVUQtp-uld) ( bio past paper 2022 feb,...

▶ Natural Selection animation (stabilizing, disruptive and directional selection) - YouTube

This natural selection animation explains about stabilizing, disruptive and directional selection. http://shomusbiology.com/Download the study materials here...

This graphic giving the evolution of tetrapods (four-legged land or hybrid land-sea animals) shows some transitional fossils. It shows Eusthenopteron at the bottom, indisputably still a fish, through several transitional animals to Pederpes at the top, indisputably a tetrapod.

Did you know that human embryos early in development have tails that later fail to grow for a lack of signaling from the genes? We end up with the coccyx at the end of our spines that protrudes a bit from our rear ends. The tailbone is barely noticeable, but it serves as a reminder of our ancient past.

Newt.
Newt. saved to Tattoo
Animals from 518 million years ago are preserved down to their softest features, and more than half are new to science.

Animals from 518 million years ago are preserved down to their softest features, and more than half are new to science.

A new species of lobopodian, a worm-like animal with soft legs from the Cambrian period (541 to 485 million years ago), has been described for the first time from fossils found in the Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

A new species of lobopodian, a worm-like animal with soft legs from the Cambrian period (541 to 485 million years ago), has been described for the first time from fossils found in the Burgess Shale in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.