Spinal fluid

Discover the functions and importance of spinal fluid in maintaining a healthy nervous system. Learn how to support spinal fluid health for optimal well-being.
Florida, Occipital Neuralgia, Spinal Fluid, Spinal Nerve, Spinal Stenosis, Vertebral Artery, Epidural, Cerebrospinal Fluid, Nerves Function

Ross Hauser, MD We see many patients who have a serious health challenge in having intracranial hypertension. In many of these people, intracranial hypertension was not initially thought of as a problem as their doctors instead tackled the symptoms that these people were facing. Symptoms included dizziness, headache, vision problems such as sensitivity to light where exaggerated pupillary hippus dilating and constricting which can cause problems with light sensitivity and the pupil fails to…

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Jane Ashley
Chronic Pain, Fitness, Occipital Neuralgia, Cervical Spinal Stenosis, Osteopathy, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Cord Injury, Spinal Fluid, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The Spinal Series This is part three of a series examining spinal issues which may mimic chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia. The first two in the series involved two very ill ME/CFS patients who have recovered or are recovering following surgery to correct craniocervical instability. Could Craniocervical Instability Be […]

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Catherine Moran
Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is classified as a decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure secondary to a CSF leakage and consequent descent of the brain into the foramen magnum. Diagnosing SIH can be difficult due to its overlapping findings with Arnold-Chiari type 1 Malformation (CM1) where the cerebellar tonsils herniate into the foramen magnum. The similarity of both conditions calls for a more reliable imaging technique to localize the CSF leak which could narrow the diffe Cerebrospinal Fluid, Epidural, Spinal Fluid, Dysphagia, Sinusitis, Cranial Nerves, Occipital, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Peer

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is classified as a decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure secondary to a CSF leakage and consequent descent of the brain into the foramen magnum. Diagnosing SIH can be difficult due to its overlapping findings with Arnold-Chiari type 1 Malformation (CM1) where the cerebellar tonsils herniate into the foramen magnum. The similarity of both conditions calls for a more reliable imaging technique to localize the CSF leak which could narrow the…

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Mary Elizabeth
Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is a liquid that has no color and fills the ventricles and canals of the Central Nervous System (CNS) and bathes its external surface. The purposes of CSF are buoyancy, protection, and chemical stability. CSF protects the brain from hitting the cranium if it is jolted. CSF is also capable of rinsing metabolic waste and regulates the chemical environment. Lpn To Rn, Behavioral Neuroscience, Intracranial Pressure, Spinal Fluid, Brain Facts, Cerebrospinal Fluid, Brain Anatomy, Psychiatric Nursing, Cranial Nerves

Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is a liquid that has no color and fills the ventricles and canals of the Central Nervous System (CNS) and bathes its external surface. The purposes of CSF are buoyancy, protection, and chemical stability. CSF protects the brain from hitting the cranium if it is jolted. CSF is also capable of rinsing metabolic waste and regulates the chemical environment.

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