More ideas from Yannis
Venetian galea sottila, late 15th century. Detail from Vittore Carpaccio's Return of the Ambassadors to the English Court (1497–98),  Legend of Saint Ursula series. Accademia, Venice. The galea sottile (thin galley) was the typical warship galley of the Mediterranean, 9th-18th C; in peacetime also used for commercial transport of precious goods of small bulk, given the limited availability of space for cargo. Note oars arranged in groups of 3, according to the alla sensile rowing method.

A Venetian galea sottila from the late century from Vittore Carpaccio's Return of the Ambassadors in the series Legend of Saint Ursula Note the oars arranged in groups of three according to the alla sensile rowing method.

Ancient World Alive | Titan(ic)s of the Past, Part 2 Nemi ships – The Floating Palaces

The Caligula’s Nemi ships were colossal vessels hosting a palace and a temple on board. They were called “Floating Palaces” as the Emperor Caligula built them for his residence and private temple of Diana and used to spend much of his time on them.

Navire romain (aquarelle de Jean-Marie Gassend, 2005)

Roman ship (art by Jean-Marie Gassend) after the wreck of the Madrague de Giens (ca BC) with her load of amphoras.

Evolution of the Greek Warship, from the penteconter (top) to the Roman imperial quinquereme of the Greek type

Dreme battleship Evolution of the Greek Warship, from the penteconter (top) to the Roman imperial quinquereme of the Greek type