lkrory21

lkrory21

Athens, GR / You only pass through this life once; you don't come back for an encore (Elvis Presley)
lkrory21
Περισσότερες ιδέες από το lkrory21
Check out "Inside The World Galaxy Of Alice Coltrane" by lkrory21 on Mixcloud

Check out "Inside The World Galaxy Of Alice Coltrane" by lkrory21 on Mixcloud

Kiki Hitomi

Kiki Hitomi

lkrory21's HauptPunkte: [Selected Aphex Works]

lkrory21's HauptPunkte: [Selected Aphex Works]

4 4 ταινίες για τη χρονιά που φεύγει (στην πραγματικότητα μόλις για το δεύτερο εξάμηνο του 2014)

4 4 ταινίες για τη χρονιά που φεύγει (στην πραγματικότητα μόλις για το δεύτερο εξάμηνο του 2014)

[#Blogovision2014: Fünf]

[#Blogovision2014: Fünf]

A meteorologist lives alone at an isolated Arctic outpost, measuring the temperatures, the snowfall, and the winds.

A meteorologist lives alone at an isolated Arctic outpost, measuring the temperatures, the snowfall, and the winds.

My email is a monster

My email is a monster

Johnny Cash at San Quentin: Ten newly released photos

Johnny Cash at San Quentin: Ten newly released photos

Some folks just landed on the surface of a COMET using ROCKETS, HARPOONS, AND MATH

Some folks just landed on the surface of a COMET using ROCKETS, HARPOONS, AND MATH

Looking at the Icebergs. The Ross Sea off Franklin Island, Antarctica, December 2006.   John Palmer is a medical doctor from Australia. When he is onboard the I/B Kapitan Klebnikov as resident doctor, his duties also include acting as the traffic operator for the ship’s two helicopters. Here, he looks off into the distance where two massive icebergs are about to collide in a strong swell.   Camille Seaman   | WIRED.com

Looking at the Icebergs. The Ross Sea off Franklin Island, Antarctica, December 2006. John Palmer is a medical doctor from Australia. When he is onboard the I/B Kapitan Klebnikov as resident doctor, his duties also include acting as the traffic operator for the ship’s two helicopters. Here, he looks off into the distance where two massive icebergs are about to collide in a strong swell. Camille Seaman | WIRED.com