Tigrayan-woman-with-her-son-in-a-traditional-harness,-Tigray,-Ethiopia.jpg

Religion And Life In Tigray

Rock churches, ancient customs and time-old ways of living in the spectacular, mountainous heart of Ethiopia.

Modern-day Tigray has been at the cross roads of natural disasters, conflict and political turmoil. These difficulties have led to virtually no development in much of the region's rural areas. While the lack of development has translated into relatively low living standards, the scarcity of contact with the modern-world has also meant that Christian Ethiopia's ancient culture, traditions and history have been preserved in Tigray's remote corners better than virtually anywhere else.

Religion And Life In Tigray

Ijen---Sulfur-miner-makes-the-climb-up-with-a-heavy-load.jpg-Kawah Ijen is Java's famous sulfur-belching volcanic crater. It is also the regular workplace for almost three hundred men, who make the grueling journey up the mountain and down the crater rim to mine sulfur.

Kawah Ijen

Sulfur miners in Eastern Java's famous sulfur-belching Ijen crater rely on their sheer muscle power to mine sulfur in some of the most difficult working conditions in the world.

Sulfur-miner-unloads-his-load-of-sulfur-into-a-truck.jpg

Kawah Ijen

A look at the people who make a living inside the sulphur-belching Ijen crater, possibly the toughest work environment on the planet.

Kawah-Ijen---Sulfur-miner-making-the-climb.jpg-At the sulfur collection base, each load is weighed. The higher the weight - the higher the pay. The average wage, despite being extremely low by 'Western' standards is at least twice higher than anything the men could earn elsewhere in rural Java. Those who have the energy or large debts, make two and even three trips to Ijen crater and back.

Kawah Ijen

A look at the people who make a living inside the sulphur-belching Ijen crater, possibly the toughest work environment on the planet.

The miners load their creaking bamboo baskets with broken chunks of sulfur until the weight reaches 50kg - 100kg, depending on the strength of the individual. As they make their journey back, the terrain becomes more difficult to navigate. Steep mountain paths, crumbling rocks and a steady 'traffic' of other miners and tourists are a constant challenge. A step in the wrong direction can mean death.

Kawah Ijen

Sulfur-miner-preparing-to-lift-a-heavy-load.jpg

Kawah Ijen

A look at the people who make a living inside the sulphur-belching Ijen crater, possibly the toughest work environment on the planet.

Pilgrims-relaxing-above-the-church-of-Saint-George,-Lalibela,-Ethiopia.jpg

Christmas in Lalibela

This is the website of award winning travel photographer Mitchell Kanashkevich.

Pilgrims-sit-above-the-Saint-George-rock-church-in-Lalibela-Ethiopia.jpg

Christmas in Lalibela

Christmas in Lalibela, Ethiopia

Deacons-walk-with-a-flame-in-a-procession-during-Christmas-celebrations,-Lalibela,-Ethiopia.jpg-Lalibela is also one of the main centres for celebrations of Christmas or 'Ledet' (for Ethiopians). Unlike Christmas in most of the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christmas falls on the 7th of January. The days leading up to the date bring pilgrims and visitors from the surrounding areas, as well as from outside of the country. The celebrations are held over two days and culminate in a…

Christmas in Lalibela

Mitchell kanashkevinch Religion and Life in Tigray

Man-walks-with-his-ponies-on-a-street-of-Lalibela,-Ethiopia.jpg

Christmas in Lalibela

Ethiopian Orthodox Christmas celebrations are attended by thousands, culminating in a grand, mystical spectacle.

Young boys sit in the bell tower of Beta Maryam rock church. Lalibela is often referred to as Ethiopia's Jerusalem. It is one of the most sacred places for Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. The small town is most famous for its architectural marvels, the ancient rock churches, some of which were carved out from a single rock.

Christmas in Lalibela

Young boys in Lalibela, Ethiopia - Mitchell Kanashkevich Photography

Mother-preparing-coffee-adj.jpg

Religion And Life In Tigray

My love - Hate relationship with Ethiopia by Mitchell Kanashkevich

Men-pouring-Tej---traditional-Ethiopian-alcoholic-drink,-Tigray,-Ethiopia.jpg

Religion And Life In Tigray

Rock churches, ancient customs and time-old ways of living in the spectacular, mountainous heart of Ethiopia.

-The Ethiopian Church is one of the oldest in the world, dating back to 4th Century AD, when Orthodox Christianity was made the official religion of the Axumite Kingdom, present day Ethiopian region of Tigray. Over the centuries Christianity has shaped the people's psyche, as well as the landscape of Tigray, where hundreds of churches and monasteries have been erected and even carved right into mountain faces, so abundant in the region.

Religion And Life In Tigray

Young Coptic Monk in Meleke,Ethiopia.He is at spiritual sanctuary.

Pinterest
Search