Nez Perce Chief Joseph, 1901. was hard to capture because he had fast horses.  The horses were some of the original horses brought over by the Spanish.

Hin-mah-too-yah-lat-kekht (aka Thunder Traveling To Loftier Heights, aka Joseph II, aka Chief Joseph) - Nez Perce - 1901

~Antique Photograph~   Nez Perce  Ann Kamiakin George on horseback.  Washington.

Nez Perce woman named Ann Kamiakin George on horseback, Washington :: American Indians of the Pacific Northwest -- Image Portion

Ollokot (aka Alikut, aka Little Frog) the younger brother of Chief Joseph - Nez Perce - 1877

Ollokot (aka Alikut, aka Little Frog) the younger brother of Chief Joseph - Nez Perce - 1877 - till death

Looking Glass, a Nez Perce' chief, on horseback in            front of a tepee. Photograph, 1877.     American Indian Select List number 106.

Looking Glass, a Nez Perce' chief, on horseback in front of a tepee. Photograph, was also medicine man

(2) Chief Joseph (aka Joseph II) (1840-1904), Nez Percé. - Undoubtedly, his is one of the saddest and darkest stories in American history. His only sin was that he did his best to get Washington to honor its treaties with his people. His was the genius in the Nez Percé War, as he fought and retreated with his 250 warriors over 1,600 miles of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. (...) Photo by Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.

Hin-ma-toe Ya-lut-kiht (aka Thunder Rolling Over The Mountains, aka Chief Joseph, aka Joseph II) the son of Tuekakas (aka Shooting Arrow, aka Joseph I) – Nez Perce – 1877

In his final years, Chief Joseph spoke eloquently against the injustices of U.S. Government policies and racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples and he held out hope that America's promise of freedom and equality would one day be fulfilled for Native Americans as well

In his final years, Chief Joseph spoke eloquently against the injustices of U. Government policies and racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples and he held out hope that America's promise of freedom and equality would one day be fulfilled for Na

Chief Joseph,  3-3-1840 – 21-9-1904, was the leader of the Wallowa band of Nez Perce during General Oliver  Howard's attempt to forcibly remove his band and the other "non-treaty" Nez Perce to a reservation in Idaho. For his principled resistance to the removal, he became renowned as a humanitarian and peacemaker.  “Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever". On his surrender to Gen. Howard.

Chief Joseph – Nez Perce – 1903 The Chief Joseph band of Nez Perce Indians who still live on the Colville Reservation bear his name in tribute to their prestigious leader. His story of PEACE vs. violence is worth researching. What a legacy.

algonquians indians tribes | Native_American_Indian_Tribes_Chiefs_NezPerce_Indians.jpg

Chief Joseph (Nez Perce), Edmund S. Meany, Red Thunder (Nez Perce) the nephew of Chief Joseph - 1903

Chief Washakie and group. Shoshone. Late 1800s. Photo by Rose and Hopkins. Source - Denver Public Library

Chief Washakie was a renowned warrior first mentioned in 1840 in the written record of the American fur trapper, Osborne Russell. In at the urging of trapper Jim Bridger, Washakie led a band of Shoshones to the council meetings of the

A great portrait of Rain-In-The-Face, a fearless Sioux Warrior.

A great portrait of Rain-In-The-Face, a fearless Sioux Warrior. Somehow, I believe he belongs on this board. I love rain & I have Sioux in my gene pool.

The Scout, Nez Perce  Artist:	Edward Sheriff Curtis

New perce scout Date Created/Published: December Medium: 1 photographic print. Summary: Nez Percé man, seated on horse in a rocky area holding coup stick.

Chief Joseph. Equal rights.

A Nez Perce warrior Pacific Northwest, 1910 “The earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it.

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